javascript


Stability Without Stagnation: Lessons Learned Shipping Ember

Location: Salon C
April 11th, 2016
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

When we first started working on Ember in 2011, the web was a very different place. Backbone.js was just six months old, ES5 had just started to land, and around half of the page views on the web came from IE 6, 7 or 8. Fast forward to 2016: we have a number of great web frameworks, JavaScript is on an annual release schedule, and Chrome is ascendant. And while mobile phones drove negligible traffic in 2011, the picture is very different in 2016: four in ten page views came from iOS or Android last month. As a project, Ember
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Yehuda Katz

Co-Creator, Ember.js

Taming the Wild Wild West of Next-Gen Front-End Apps

Location: Salon C
April 12th, 2016
2:45 PM - 3:45 PM

With the recent release of Angular 2 and React.js capturing growing interest, there are now SO many options to build a front-end to our web applications. Along with the increasing number of developers and the explosive popularity of JavaScript, what was the wild wild west of app development is maturing with it’s own best practices and idioms of software. In this talk we’re casting a wide-net on the range of possibilities for building next-gen front-end apps by looking at the options we have for both building and deploying applications on the edge. Join us as we build and deploy an
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Ari Lerner

Author, ng-book 1 & 2, ng-newsletter

React.js Reconciliation

Location: Salon C
April 11th, 2016
10:15 AM - 11:15 AM

React is a library for building user interfaces. Developers specify how an application "should look", and React automatically updates the page when the underlying data changes. React is able to do this through a process we call "Reconciliation". In this talk, I'll describe how reconciliation works within React, and how we use it to enhance both performance and user experience. In addition to being conceptually interesting, understanding the reconciliation process will allow you to better optimize your own applications. Jim's talk is now available on the Chariot Solutions site. Slides Screencast

Jim Sproch

React Core Team, Facebook

The Node Module Diaries: Large App Architecture from the Trenches

Location: Salon E
April 12th, 2016
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

The Node.js community has evolved a number of application design patterns for JavaScript applications, including application-internal package management patterns. The all-around awesomeness of NPM has lent itself to a hyper-modular approach for Node code not seen in many other language communities. This is great, especially when writing open-source tools designed to be used by others' applications. Meanwhile, the "microservices" or "distributed systems" architectural patterns have begun their ascendancy. It makes sense to isolate components so they can be managed independently of one another. One could be forgiven for thinking that "many modules" and "microservices" are similar answers to similar questions,
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Jonathan Lipps

Director of Engineering, Sauce Labs

Virtual Reality Beyond Gaming: Immersive Technologies in the Industry

Location: Salon E
April 11th, 2016
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Virtual and augmented reality headsets are on their way to an office near you. Forecasts estimate that the immersive computing industry will be valued at over $150B by the year 2020, as consumer and enterprise device adoption grows with the release of devices by Microsoft, Oculus, Samsung, and HTC - to name just a few. As the technology sector begins to incorporate virtual and augmented reality devices into everyday scenarios, the impact across different industries will enable us to rethink the way that we use 3D content to explore and experience data. This session will provide an overview of the
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Liv Erickson

Virtual and Augmented Reality Developer Evangelist, Microsoft

WebAssembly: A New Compilation Target for the Web

Location: Salon C
April 12th, 2016
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

WebAssembly is an emerging standard which defines a new, portable, binary format to serve as a safe and efficient compiler target for the Web. Driven by active cross-browser collaboration, WebAssembly is rapidly taking shape and should be coming in the future to a browser near you. What does this new addition to the open Web platform mean for developers? This talk will provide an overview of the design of WebAssembly and explain how WebAssembly can be used to both bring existing codebases to the Web as well as complement modern web apps written in JS and HTML5. The talk will
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Luke Wagner

Research Engineer, Mozilla

Adventures in Elm: Events, Reproducibility, and Kindness

Location: Salon C
April 12th, 2016
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

What do you get when you combine strict functional programming with heavy user interaction? Challenges, and unexpected freedoms. Elm is a purely functional language for the browser. It compiles to JavaScript -- after enforcing immutability, types, semantic versioning, and tight boundaries for user and server interactions. Working within these restrictions, I find my programming principles turned upside down. Small components? Who needs them. Global state? No problem. New principles emerge instead: events, reproducibility, kindness in times of error. This session gives an overview of Elm, then focuses on the Elm Architecture: how it overturns what is essential in object-oriented and
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Jessica Kerr

Engineer, Stripe

React Native: A Better Way to Do Mobile (For Both Managers and Engineers)

Location: Salon D
April 11th, 2016
1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

In 2015, two years after its initial open source release, React took the position formerly held by Angular as the darling of the web. It's used on some of the biggest sites in the world, such as Facebook, WhatsApp, Messenger, Instagram, Netflix, Airbnb, Uber, NFL, Dropbox, Asana, Atlassian, Khan Academy, Flipkart, Imgur, Reddit, Paypal, WalMart, WordPress, Wix, SquareSpace, etc. Let's be clear though: any UI you can build with React you can also build without React. React's value proposition is that it simplifies your UI code, making it easier to build and maintain: it is declarative, component-based, uses one-way data
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Brent Vatne

React Native Contributor